Category Archives: Open Source

The Return of Lavabit

Lavabit logoThis past Friday, when most of the world was watching (or actively not-watching) the events in Washington, D.C., the formerly shuttered, Snowden-affiliated webmail service Lavabit announced it was re-launching with a new generation of email privacy and security.

If you’re unfamiliar with the history, here’s the gist: Lavabit formed in 2004, in part because of privacy concerns around email. They launched as an email service with significant protection and encryption capabilities and served a relatively small group of folk for almost a decade.

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Microsoft & Linux – seriously??

Microsoft and Linux logosMicrosoft has been a big contributor to Linux over the past several years, primarily focusing on improving support for its Hyper-V hypervisor. Jim Zemlin, executive director of the Linux Foundation, said that in becoming a member, “Microsoft is better able to collaborate with the open source community to deliver transformative mobile and cloud experiences to more people.” [Source]

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Come PHP with us!

PHP logoIf you are an experienced PHP5 developer, versed in object-oriented programming in the LAMP stack, you could be a great fit for our ever-growing team of bright, talented technologists. In this role you will expand your current knowledge and learn the latest JavaScript frameworks and libraries: Node.js, Angular.js, etc. Candidates with additional experience with other tech –  Python, Django, Java, Eclipse – will have a big advantage.

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TechTalk Wrap Up: Stacy

Lev Gimelfarb discusses StacyThis past Wednesday evening,¬†at our¬†HQ in New York, Boyle Software’s VP of R&D Lev Gimelfarb gave an excellent TechTalk¬†on his latest development effort: Stacy. It was a fantastic¬†way to reinvigorate¬†our TechTalk series after a long hiatus! We had a good turn out of Boyle Software employees as well as several colleagues, clients, and friends. Pizza was consumed, beverages were imbibed, and we all learned some new things…

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Yet Another Result Set Parser

Database graph, distortedEfficiently parsing SQL query result sets into the hierarchical data structures with which applications normally operate has been a problem for quite a long time. Numerous attempts¬†have been made over what feels like the ages to solve the problem, the essence of which is that the strictly two-dimensional grid nature of what’s returned by a SQL SELECT query¬†–¬†those rows and columns¬†–¬†map very¬†poorly to the tree.¬†More generally speaking, ¬†they don’t suit the graph-like data structures utilized by modern applications to model the world. Continue reading

Stacy: S3-served dynamic websites

Stacy - partial diagramServing a website from Amazon S3 is great: it’s fast, it’s inexpensive, and it doesn’t require maintaining a web server. But this simplicity can be limiting, coming at¬†a price: you can only serve absolutely static files;¬†there is no server-side logic whatsoever.

On the other hand, we are now seeing the¬†rise of so called “API-first content management systems.” These systems, in true cloud spirit, are usually provided as a hosted service, give you ¬†a standardized user interface for structuring and managing your content, but do not deal with any aspects of your content presentation. They don’t deal with themes, templates, pages, etc. Instead, you have a fast and simple RESTful API that gives you access to your content and you are free to render it with¬†whatever presentation you want outside of the CMS.

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NPM and friends

npm logo[A couple of months ago, the open source community and npm were rocked by an author’s¬†unpublishing of a module called “kik.” This unprecedented action, which brought down scores of projects that were dependent¬†upon the kik module,¬†was the result of a dispute over ownership of the name “kik” itself. Nestor Fedyk has some interesting things to say about this dispute. Read on… — The Editor]

This is a late response to¬†this article¬†about the deletion of the “kik” module from npm. Most people have sided with either Azer Ko√ßulu or npm on in this dispute¬†and it sort of became quite at “the moment .”

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