Category Archives: Databases

SQL Databases in Node.js

Node.js is one of the best current platforms available for creating back-end applications that expose REST APIs. Often such applications are backed with a database. Nowadays, many NoSQL databases are available that integrate easily with the platform and operate using JSON data format and associated principles – so they’re natural to both a JavaScript platform such as Node.js and the modern REST APIs. These databases usually offer speed, conceptual simplicity, as well as massive horizontal scalability and parallelism – all great when the application, like many modern social media platforms and other services exposed to the end users on the Internet, works with large numbers of users. At the same time, the structural complexity of the data in the context of a single user is usually relatively simple and therefore can be handled perfectly by a NoSQL database.

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Floating (and coding) on Cloud9

Cloud9 logoI was always a bit skeptical of the whole Cloud IDE thing, that was until recently when I gave Cloud9 a shot. I must admit, I was surprised when I read the Engineering Orientation wiki page for one of our clients, Vroom.com, as it suggested I create a Cloud9 IDE account as part of my project setup. What??

I figured I’d give it a try…

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Come PHP with us!

PHP logoIf you are an experienced PHP5 developer, versed in object-oriented programming in the LAMP stack, you could be a great fit for our ever-growing team of bright, talented technologists. In this role you will expand your current knowledge and learn the latest JavaScript frameworks and libraries: Node.js, Angular.js, etc. Candidates with additional experience with other tech –  Python, Django, Java, Eclipse – will have a big advantage.

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Yet Another Result Set Parser

Database graph, distortedEfficiently parsing SQL query result sets into the hierarchical data structures with which applications normally operate has been a problem for quite a long time. Numerous attempts have been made over what feels like the ages to solve the problem, the essence of which is that the strictly two-dimensional grid nature of what’s returned by a SQL SELECT query – those rows and columns – map very poorly to the tree. More generally speaking,  they don’t suit the graph-like data structures utilized by modern applications to model the world. Continue reading

ORM must go!

No ORM!Object Relational Mapping, or ORM, has enjoyed a long run of being accepted as a standard paradigm for middle-tier, server-side software work with a back-end database. It’s wide spread and “no-brainer” status originated, probably, with the popularity of a single, exceptionally successful Java framework called Hibernate. The idea behind ORM is blending the line that separates the middle-tier and the persistence layer and making them practically one piece. So-called persistent objects become something that simultaneously belongs to the persistence layer and the rest of the application that works with them – often even in the presentation layer.

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Amazon RDS for MariaDB

unnamedNews from Amazon… MariaDB is now available as a fully-managed service on AWS with up to 6TB of storage, 30,000 IOPS, and support for high-availability deployments through the Amazon Relational Database Service. Amazon RDS for MariaDB is available in all commercial regions. You can start running production workloads from day one with high availability using multiple availability zones.

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Amazon Aurora Now Available

We are taking a serious look into Amazon’s Aurora database engine.unnamed

From Amazon… “Amazon Aurora is now available to all customers. Amazon Aurora is a MySQL-compatible relational database management system (RDBMS) that combines the speed and availability of high-end commercial databases with the simplicity and cost-effectiveness of open source databases. Amazon Aurora provides up to five times better performance than MySQL at a price point one tenth that of a commercial RDBMS while delivering similar performance and availability.”

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